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Every Hero Has a Story -- Meet the heroes of Ouray! REMINDER: Join us today, Wednesday, July 29, at 2 p.m. in Fellin Park. All rising first- to fifth-grade students are invited to attend today's Summer Reading Program to meet members of the Ouray Emergency Medical Services, Ouray Mountain Rescue, Ouray Police Department, and Ouray Volunteer Fire Department. ... See MoreSee Less

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Every Hero Has a Story -- Meet the heroes of Ouray! All rising first- to fifth-grade students are invited to attend the Ouray Public Library's Summer Reading Program on Wednesday, July 29, at 2 p.m. This week's program will be held in Fellin Park. Join us and meet members of the Ouray Emergency Medical Services, Ouray Mountain Rescue, Ouray Police Department, and Ouray Volunteer Fire Department. ... See MoreSee Less

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Let's put the "book" in Facebook, Ouray!

Today's glimpse into our local book collection brings us: "Ouray's Historic Main Street: Early Visions, Wild Times" by Ann C. Hoffman et al.

www.aspencat.info/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=39086

This spiral-bound book gives a geographical tour through the history of Ouray's eight-block Main Street. The authors have recreated the central business district block-by-block with historical narrative and photography to add to the intrigue of each spot. This local book was intended to illuminate and elaborate upon the historical markers of Main Street, and it does not disappoint!

Here is an example of one of the riveting stories from Block 10: 600-646 Main Street:

"Thomas Hiebler, a well-known and respected citizen, who had erected a beautiful two-story structure in the middle of the block in 1889, was changing the first floor wholesale liquor store into a saloon that he would call the Cabinet Club House. And, about that time, Mr. Hiebler married a very successful Ouray madam, Sadie Tabor, who had a very good head for business. Perhaps she was the inspiration behind the establishment of the Cabinet Club where the wholesale liquor store had been. Sadie owned several "sporting" houses in the red light district: the Club, Temple of Music, Bon Ton, and the Bird Cage. Whether or not she had married Thomas before a general raid was made on the "sporting" houses on Second Street between Seventh and Eight Avenues is not known. The Silverite Plaindealer titled an article "Wholesale Arrests" in the year 1900. The paper reported:

There was a general raid on the sporting houses . . . Wednesday night and the same course was continued yesterday and last night and the results is that the basement of city hall resembles a second-class woman's boarding house today. A number have paid their fines and were released, but a dozen are still city boarders and will have a hearing today.

Do you suppose good, old, and respectable, Tom went to City Hall to bail out his ladylove?

Thomas Hiebler died in 1906. Two years later Sadie was shot in the head by Tim Lynch, a drunken boarder. It is not know why this happened. The bullet entered through her right ear, careened downward through her head and lodged in her neck below the left jaw. Unfortunately, she did not die instantly. The assaulter then shot himself and died within the hour of the incident. Sadie was buried at Ouray's Cedar Hill Cemetery, next to her husband, in the shadow of his large monument. There was no monument to Sadie, not even a tiny marker on her grave. Only the cemetery records testified to the fact that she was buried there. Sadie Tabor Hiebler was 45 years old. Tim Lynch, Sadie's assassin, was also buried in an unmarked grave at Cedar Hill Cemetery. His remained were buried in a plot with the body of a 24-day old infant. Why?"
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